An Alternative Formulation of Existential Risk

Reblogged from Grand Strategy: The View from Oregon:

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Monday

Seventh in a Series on Existential Risk:

Infosec as a Guide to Existential Risk

Many of the simplest and seemingly most obvious ideas that we invoke almost every day of our lives are the most inscrutably difficult to formulate in any kind of rigorous way. This is true of time, for example. Saint Augustine famously asked in his…

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Grand Strategy: The View from Oregon

Monday


Seventh in a Series on Existential Risk:

risk taxonomy

Infosec as a Guide to Existential Risk


Many of the simplest and seemingly most obvious ideas that we invoke almost every day of our lives are the most inscrutably difficult to formulate in any kind of rigorous way. This is true of time, for example. Saint Augustine famously asked in his Confessions:

What then is time? If no one asks me, I know: if I wish to explain it to one that asketh, I know not: yet I say boldly that I know, that if nothing passed away, time past were not; and if nothing were coming, a time to come were not; and if nothing were, time present were not. (11.14.17)

quid est ergo tempus? si nemo ex me quaerat, scio; si quaerenti explicare velim, nescio. fidenter tamen dico scire me quod, si nihil praeteriret, non esset praeteritum tempus…

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Europeans Will Now Know When And What Data Gets Compromised In A Breach — Unless It Was Encrypted

Reblogged from TechCrunch:

In the wake of the latest notice from a major internet company revealing that user data has been compromised — Facebook’s admission of a security bugcompromising data from 6 million users — the European Commission today ispublishing new, Europe-wide rules that will require ISPs, carriers, broadband providers and others to report to both national regulators and to subscribers more specific detail about what has been compromised within 24 hours of the breach.

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SMEs are putting larger customers at risk of security breaches

Reblogged from Brian Pennington:

According to Shred-it’s third annual Security Tracker survey SMEs in the UK are putting their own businesses at risk and could also be damaging larger firms they supply services to by not taking enough preventative measures of confidential data.

It’s good business sense for larger companies to ask whether their suppliers have a data protection partner and an information security system in place – not only to prevent sensitive information being lost by a third party but also because the financial and reputational damage of a breach could put that supplier out of business and cause havoc in the supply chain,” warns Robert Guice, Vice President Shred-it EMEA.

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Brian Pennington

According to Shred-it’s third annual Security Tracker survey SMEs in the UK are putting their own businesses at risk and could also be damaging larger firms they supply services to by not taking enough preventative measures of confidential data.

It’s good business sense for larger companies to ask whether their suppliers have a data protection partner and an information security system in place – not only to prevent sensitive information being lost by a third party but also because the financial and reputational damage of a breach could put that supplier out of business and cause havoc in the supply chain,” warns Robert Guice, Vice President Shred-it EMEA.

The survey reveals SMEs are 10 times less likely to have an information security system set up than is the case with larger businesses.

SMEs continue to hugely underestimate the potential cost of a data breach to them. In terms of financial loss, the Information Commissioner’s Office…

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